Kirkjufell Mountain in Iceland

Kirkjufell Mountain in Iceland – Photograph by Laura Lecce

This particular mountain in Iceland has become famous due to it’s use as an impressive back drop in the Game of Thrones television series. Usually it is photographed as a formidable snowy mountain or a luscious grass-green temple with waterfalls in the foreground. Since these two scenarios are hugely overdone, I thought I’d share a spring time photo. A photo that marks the end of the snow melting away but before the grass has had a chance to spring back to life and regain its green complexion. It showcases the orange/brown grass which contrasts the blue of the sky and it’s reflection in the water below. The cute little house that also features in this photo is typical of almost all the houses and buildings you see in Iceland – they are all uniformly white with adorable red roofs. One thing this photo cannot convey to the observer is the extreme wind that is blowing through here in this moment. I took this photo from the car because going outside was almost unbearable.

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Merry Christmas 2018

Christmas Bird 2018 – Photograph by Laura Lecce

A very merry Christmas and happy New Year to everyone! I’m looking forward to seeing the wonderful creatures that 2019 will bring. I am now back in Australia permanently, so hopefully some beautiful Aussie birds will come and say hi.

The dragonfly that stood still and smiled

The smiling dragonfly – Photography by Laura Lecce

It might not have been the prettiest of colours, but this dragonfly stood still long enough for me to get some pretty good photos. Not only did it sit for a while, but even smiled for the photo (well not really, its mouth parts just give that impression). If you Google “dragonfly faces”, you get quite a selection of adorable dragonfly closeups showing you the different expressions of various dragonflies, some are very happy and others are quite grumpy looking. It’s an odd sight considering a dragonfly face is not something many of us get to see, especially since they’re mostly whizzing around at top speeds between 30-60 km/h (19-38 mph).

The dragonfly that stood still – Photograph by Laura Lecce

The three seabirds

The three seabirds – Photograph by Laura Lecce

Not all seabirds are what we imagine. When I hear “seabird” I think of a large pointy-winged hunter gliding over the ocean, waiting to dive for its prey just below the surface of the water. Or, I think of a huge colony of squabbling seagulls on the sand fighting over their food. In this photo however, are a trio of fairly timid and quiet seabirds that are often overlooked for a photo. I think that the red-brown feathers and bright orange legs are a perfect match for this crystal clear, aqua blue water.

Woodpecker in Belize

Woodpecker in Belize – Photograph by Laura Lecce

Since we’re on the topic of woodpeckers, I thought I’d show you a different kind. This beautiful, puffed out bird was diligently hole checking on an island in Belize. It was traveling with a friend from palm tree to palm tree, which made me realize that the woodpeckers I’ve seen have often traveled in pairs. I’m not entirely sure what kind of woodpecker this is, as it has the face markings of a ladderback woodpecker, but more yellow coloring on the underbelly than usual. I saw them at the same times each day which gave me multiple opportunities to observe their behavior and get some great photos.

Woodpecker with a radical hairdo

Woodpecker with a radical hairdo – Photograph by Laura Lecce

This was a treat to finally get to photograph on of the largest woodpeckers in America. Growing up in Australia I didn’t know there were different types of woodpeckers, I thought there was only one. This particular bird is a Pileated Woodpecker that lives in Yosemite National Park. My ignorance about the woodpecker is valid considering they exist worldwide except for Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, Madagascar and extreme polar regions. In America, well before I had even seen a woodpecker, I had learned to recognize the signs of woodpecker activity on trees who have had numerous holes poked into them and display naked areas where the bark has been hammered off. I’ve also often heard the bird in the distance hammering on the tree, but not actually seen the individual making all the noise. They hit the tree surprisingly hard with their beaks over and over again at incredible speed, it is a wonder how they don’t have a permanent migraine.